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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
her decades of teasing us with her crossword puzzles. the retired couple from scotland are the winners of a massive european lottery. their price is 185 million euros. that is the equivalent of $260 million. it is officially the biggest ever jackpot in your. they are among the 500 richest people in britain. he says they were tickled pink. in the last few minutes, it has been announced that the ceo of dow jones is resigning. the story was first reported in the "wall street journal. " it comes on the same day that rebekah brooks resigned. rupert murdoch also issued an apology to the family of milly dowler the murdered girl whose hacked phone started the crisis. you can read more about that story and the rest of the news on our website a. make sure to check out our facebook page. thank you for watching. have a good weekend. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide ra
is a story for you. a retired couple from scotland are the winners of the mass of -- massive lottery. their prize, 185 million bureaus, the equivalent of $260 million. it puts them among the 500 richest people in britain. as for reactions, they were tickled pink. i think i would have put it more slightly stronger than that -- slightly more stronger than that, but you can read it along with the rest of the day's news at bbc.com/news. plus, check out our facebook page. for all of us at bbc world news america, thank you for watching and have a great weekend. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles. announcer: this program was made possible by: >> ♪ i'm a whirlibird... >> chuck e. cheese's, proud supporter of pbs kid
the recognition and gratitude of the nation. >> a retired couple from scotland has emerged as the winners of the record-breaking euro millions jackpot. they say it felt like a dream when they realized they had won. [applause] >> they say they are just a normal family, not flashy and not celebrity. a retired tv cameramen and foreigners are now one of which britain's wealth is couples. they were still rechecking the numbers when dawn broke. >> we could see the sun come out. it was just magical. we saw the kids were sleeping. it was absolutely -- we opened a bottle of wine. >> here come the results now. >> with morning came the confirmation that they had won the largest ever jackpot. the wind can uphold them to 140th london's richest. they would have preferred not to go public. but they did not think they could keep their massive winds secret and wanted to enjoy it. >> we are not scared of it. it will be so much fun. >> they are determined to do something good with the windfall. there's talk of foreign travel and may be a new car. >> i think we will not be immediately swapping cars. you have
on this issue, and of course, scotland yard has been tainted by this with the top cops in the country now resigning. people are wondering just how far does this scandal, does the corruption go? >> okay, atia shubert joining us live from westminster, many thanks for that, atika will also be on the show later on to give us more insight into what we can expect and what the consequences of what's going to be said today will be. manisha? >> also nina you mentioned earlier how the stock price has been affected. we've been tracking the slump in news corp stock in the wake of the hacking allegations. news corp shares actually closed up by just over 2.5%. in australia today, that reprieve coming after a two-year low on monday and as bloomberg reports that news corp is considering replacing rupert murdoch with coo chase caray. the company dismissed speculation that murdoch may step down. as for news corp's u.s. shares they sank to a six-month low monday dropping another 5% and the company's loss more than $8 billion in market value in the past two weeks alone. july 5th, which was when those allegat
. earlier, fionnuala sweeney spoke with rose gentle in scotland. her son was killed in iraq. >> i'm quite happy that that trsh newspaper is going to be shut down. will he open another paper up? >> reporter: what do you think should be done if these allegations are proven? >> if they're proven, they should go to court. everybody responsible should be put in front of a judge and if they're guilty, they should be sentenced. >> what would you like to say to those responsible? >> i would like to know why they felt they needed to hack my phone when it was concerning my son, i had lost a season. >> the outrage of the "news of the world" phone hacking is likely to be felt by other papers. >> the guardian first broke the news of the illegal hacking by "news of the world." richard quest spoke with michael white, assistant editor of "the guardian" newspaper. he sa >> i think rupert murdoch or james murdoch, his son, who runs the show in this country, has attempted to sacrifice the "news of the world" in order to safe the bskyb bed and to save rebecca brooks. why rebecca brooks? why shouldn't she be
now to the alternative though. but in scotland, the people were like the new members for their default legislators. and the results very between surprising and standing. and wales later celebrated taking outright control of the national assembly. in northern ireland it was a night of trance. robinson retained his job as minister in the most notable results came in scotland. the smb select the challenge of raber one outside control of the parliament, so stargate inevitable thoughts about the referendum when they sued on scottish independence. in between the big u.k. events, huge global event happened in the early hours of the first of may, osama bin laden, probably the best most wanted man was shot dead by americans peschel forces. osama bin laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we
been summoned to a meeting with detectives here at scotland yard. the fundamental question remains. who knew about phone hacking and how long has it been going on? dan rivers, cnn, london. >> well, the decision to withdraw advertising revenue and advertising business from companies like ford with the news of the world is one not being taken lightly. although the latest sales figures for the month of april show the sunday newspaper circulation was down 8% on last year. take a look at this. it still has almost 28% of the market. that means it puts up a total of no less than $2.61 million in terms of sales. you're watching world business today. european leaders meet to see how far they're willing to go to help greece. portugal's phones are being cut. and the u.s. debt ceiling is in need of a lift. we're talking debt when we come back. man on tv: ...rbis and 36 homers. swings at the first pitch and fouls it deep back into the stands. [ding] [fans whirring] announcer: chill raw and prepared foods promptly. one in 6 americans will get sick from food poisoning this year. check your steps at fo
in scotland but as a matter of principle refuse to alternative services as well and sent to prison. more than 6,000 young englishmen went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to the point* in time ever imprisoned for political reasons, they serve the sentences in places like here coming southwest london, that metal netting stretching across the opening is to prevent people from committing suicide. and prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under the rule of silence rerun not allowed to talk to our fellow prisoners. they found ways around a buy tapping and whispering but to live under those conditions was tough. the diet was terrible, shortage comment it was cold and many people died in prison. i was fascinated by the stories. for the longest time i could not figure out how from a story telling point* of view i would get the resistors and the generals into the same book. i did not want to do a series of portraits of one then the other but then a clue came to me one day when i wis reading a scholarly article about a well-known pacifist. she was the ardent o
papers, she's out on bail. headline two, the head of scotland yard resigns. sir paul stevenson is quitting over criticism how he handled the saga. >> as commissioner i carry ultimate responsibility for the position we find ourselves in. with hindsight i wish we had sunlged matters involve this affair differently. i didn't and that's that. >>> brace for an explosive few days ahead. ra beck that brooks, rupert murdock and his son are scheduled to be questioned by british lawmakers tuesday. >>> 15 seconds of news from canada. classic rockers chief trick got a scare as their stage collapsed at the ottawa blues fest. the stage blew over in severe weather. that's where we snagged these pictures. check out the stage before. and after. it's barely recognizable. good news, no serious injuries. >>> you hear the words grope and airport and junk-touching security checkpoint horror stories pop to mind. there's a twist. phoenix police arrested a would-be passenger, a 61-year-old woman shown here for allegedly squeezing and twisting a tsa officer's breasts. they say she rushed through the scr
are getting reports this morning scotland yards made an arrest in connection with the news corporation's phone hacking scandal. london's top cop is going to be in the hot seat today. let's bring in dan rivers. he has the latest live in london this morning. good morning, dan. >> reporter: good morning, yeah. another arrest this morning in this police inquiry. we understand that may be a former editor of "the news of the world." that's according to sky news here. he has been arrested this morning, taken into police custody. no comment from the news international themselves. the bigger picture here is there's still confusion about this request for the embamted chi chief. they are all being told to come and report to a committee here on tuesday. the deadline for them to respond is this morning. so far the committee had no response. this is pretty serious stuff. they can't force rupert and james murdoch to appear but they can force rebecca brooks to appear. if she continues to refuse to respond, issue a summons to her, they receiptcally they could send their security apparatus of the house behind m
is the incompetence of scotland yard. the head of scotland yard has left, the deputy to scotland yard has left and the incompetence of london's authorities was very much on display in that hearing room. there are only 50 seats in that room. that's not wembley stadium or yankee stadium. that is a small room. the idea that the authorities there could not keep an assault and that's what this was, an assault, from taking place is just completely outrageous and the people who run parliament security ought to be absolutely ashamed of themselves. >> you mentioned this isn't wembley stadium but the man in custody getting his face wiped by the police looks like he was attending a sporting event. certainly stood out from the suits and the business attire that we saw. we know from our producer in the room that this man came from the back of the room, had a bag, opened up the bag. this all taking place while everybody watched. it seems inconceivable that that could happen. >> you know, all of us in the united states are unhappily used to going through metal detectors, having people check our belongings, b
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
's coming in. we've got the picture, we make $1 million on the newspaper. >> the top two at scotland yard are now out. this is going to lop don this week -- london this weekend to look at the olympics. in one year from now, the world is coming there and scotland yard is in tatters. >> a lot to go. >> thanks, guys. >>> coming up, somalia is becoming the next target on the war on terror. the investigative reporter for the nation, jeremy skayhill. and chief white house correspondent chuck todd. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. my contacts are so annoying. i can't wait to take 'em out. [ male announcer ] know the feeling? try acuvue® oasys brand contact lenses with hydraclear® plus for exceptional comfort. it feels like it disappeared on my eye! [ male announcer ] discover why it's the brand eye doctors trust most for comfort. acuvue® oasys brand. [ male announcer ] get ready for the left lane. the volkswagen autobahn for all event is back. right now, get a great deal on new volkswagen models, including the cc. and every volkswagen includes scheduled carefree maintenance.
from members of britain's parliament. in this case that now involves scotland yard, very high-level politicians there. >> cbs news correspondent michelle miller has more on the biggest challenge ever to this powerful media mogul. >> it all shows lack of good judgment. >> reporter: for days, ministers in parliament have called for answers from the man rarely forced to answer anyone. now, rupert murdoch must face british lawmakers in a high-stakes effort to defend himself and his media empire. according to a bloomberg report, the 80-year-old ceo is under growing pressure to step down. and may be replaced by current coo chase kerry. >> they're in big trouble. they have criminal investigations that they have to go through. they have parliamentary investigations and they have a lot of shareholders who are really restless. >> reporter: restless because in the two weeks since the phone hacking scandal broke, stock in murdoch's parent company, news corp, has dropped nearly 15%. a loss of an estimated $6 billion. in 30 years, murdoch transformed a single australian newspaper into the w
. this is producing interests facts between murdoch's newspapers and scotland yards. >> the british tabloid schedule and unprecedented day for the owner at the center of it. elizabeth palmer is outside parliament with the latest. >> reporter: as you said, the murdochs have been testifying in front of what is technically a committee on media culture and sport. but i can tell you that the atmosphere around here is much more like a cross between epic drama and an imposition. the set for this drama, the splendor of britain's westminster parliament. the star of the show, media titan rupert murdoch. as investors around the world hanging on his every word and gesture. he is used to giving orders and not answering questions especially from politicians who until recently held him in either awe or terror. >> this is the most humble day of my life. >> reporter: by his side, his son james, the senior executive in the murdoch family empire. >> the company has admitted liability to victims of illegal voice mail interceptions, has apologized unreservedly, which i repeat today, to those victims, and the company als
people have been arrested but it may not end there. scotland yard believes the investigation will continue to grow and along with it the pressure on rupert murdoch's media empire. >> that was stephanie gosk. >> the real story there and willie touched on it, hugh grant has looked the same for 20 years. before knotting hill -- >> doesn't get work done. >> there was -- he did "about a boy", i like that one but he got old there then he got young again. i don't know how that happens. he's looking good. isn't that the story, the best analysis you've heard this morning. >> i would like to follow up with simon. >> you know who else hasn't aged? >> who? >> i remember watching him and it was in '63, the beatles still a year away but simon hobbs known as the ed sullivan of great britain, he hasn't aged a year. >> it's extraordinary, it's in the british genes. good morning. you know the germans have a word, it's called -- >> what are you upset about today? >> the germans have a word it's taking place here at other people's misfortune. in business terms, you know, you cut through really w
hired by both 10 downing street and scotland yard. those decisions taking their toll at the top. >> i wish we had -- involvement in this affair differently. i didn't and that is that. >> reporter: rupert murdoch, his son james, and rebekah brooks, the chain of command over the tabloid embroiled by scandal for almost a decade. today, they are called before parliament. >> this isn't a man who doesn't mow what is going on. everybody is scared to death to do anything that he doesn't like so he's the spider in the middle of this web. >> yes, he did apologize many times. i don't think somebody could have held their hands -- head in their hands so many times and say they are they were sorry. >> reporter: an apology, even answers. it may not be enough. ♪ good afternoon to you! it is just after 2:30 in the afternoon. 9:30 on the eastern seaboard. this is an important day in british history in the british parliamentary life and for the media industry, not only in the united kingdom but around the world. the day when rupert murdoch and his son and his former editor go before a parliamentary se
movies like "the last king of scotland." his new project capture 24 hours of everyday life around the entire world. he asked you to upload video to youtube. took that footage, made it into a documentary called "life in a day." ready for your close-up? kevin joins us live in the studios next. she's had these shoes a long time. they're kind of my thing. and they were looking... nasty. vile. but i used tide and tide booster, and look at them now! now they can be my thing forever. yay. that's my tide. what's yours? i use tide sport because it helps get odors out of athletic clothes. i mean, i wear my yoga pants for everything. hiking, biking, pilates... [ woman ] brooke... okay. i wear yoga pants because i am too lazy for real pants. that's my tide. what's yours? >>> gloom good morning, new york city, partly cloudy, 76, feels like it's 76, thunderstorms about 80 degrees. >> last week, michele our producer was putting this pictures up of new york and thought she was lying. you couldn't see anything. soupy, gross, disgusting, that looks nice. >>> get ready for your close-up a film debut
it used to obtain gordon brown's sons medical records. even so, scotland yard is investigating all of the accusations and is casting a wide net. pop singer george michael says he's being called in for questioning after a number of tweets he posted about rebecca brooks. he said in one of them that she told him that almost all of their information comes directly from police. in a later tweet he said that police received, quote, a nice little wad of cash for the service. ann? >> this story just keeps on growing. thank you so much. >>> 7:09. here's matt. >> ann, thanks very much. now to washington and the heat that president obama and congressional leaders are under to reach a deal on slashing the budget deficit. nbc's kristen welker is at the white house with the latest on this. good morning. good to see you. >> good morning. good to see you, too. president obama will meet with congressional leaders again today. the two sides still very much deadlocked. and the clock is ticking. >> thank you very much. >> reporter: with the deadline looming, president obama and congressional leaders m
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)